ultranos

obscureliteraryreference:

themarchrabbit:

onsheka:

thepioden:

gessorly:

tyrror:

ruingaraf:

themarchrabbit:

Seriously, it kills me when I see people hold scientists up as pinnacles of logic and reason.

Because one time the professor I was interning for got punched in the face by another professor, because mine got the funding, and told the other professor his theory was stupid.

This same professor told me to throw rocks to scare the “stupid fucking crabs” into moving so we could count them properly.

SCIENCE

thank you

this is one of the best comments this post has recieved

I have witnessed:

Two professors hiding around a corner and snickering, “Shhh, here she comes!” While a female professor approached and, when she finally found them, she proceeded to scream while pointing from one to the other, “You! I called your office but you weren’t there! So I tried to call YOUR office to figure out where HE was but YOU weren’t there!”

Two grad students standing outside a closed and locked door yelling, “Come out of the damn office. You haven’t left for days. If you didn’t have a couch in there I’d be concerned as to where you were sleeping!”

A religious studies professor apologizing for being late to class because, “security stopped me because I’m dressed like a hobbit”

Watched a professor snort the results of my experiment to determine if I had the right final compound.

Two archeology professors toss priceless fossilized teeth back and forth in an attempt to figure out who is smarter by “guessing the type of tooth and species of animal before it lands”

Multiple fully degreed individuals throw dry ice at one another in an attempt to be first to use the lab/get that piece of equipment/or change the iPod song.

A genetics professor build furniture out of stacks of paper and planks of wood because she is that far behind in grading papers/responding. One of the impromptu furniture pieces housed a fish tank.

I could go on but I think that covers the larger portion of the insanity…

Every time it comes around on my dash, it gets better.

I have had a professor buy a huge fuckoff bottle of rum during fieldwork in Costa Rica and let the undergrads get wasted because “you’re not underage in Costa Rica and we’ll be up all night with the bats anyway!”

- Same professor hung a bat from her headlamp and wore it as a decoration for an entire night. 

- A whole swarm of older women - and these are women with PhDs and world-renown bat experts, the bigwigs - all, to a woman, go to the formal charity dinner at an international research symposium in Toronto in late October dressed in skimpy Batgirl costumes. Because Halloween was that weekend, you see.

- At a different conference, a professor get blackout drunk and pass out on the side of the road. 

- “Yeah, we have to say we did it properly for the grant but to be really honest, Miracle-gro works better.”

- Teaching lab: we had liquid nitrogen for a demo, and after class the professor, the other TA, and I spent a good two hours freezing and breaking things in it. 

a chemistry class begins with 30 students nine months later just six of us left sitting on tables dipping paper into contaminated chemicals to see what happens when we burn it teacher making idle suggestions while he marks our work

"go to the fume hood thing, yeah now put some potassium in chlorine" can i burn the results sir? "fuck it sure whatever its tainted anyway"

The prof I’m working for just asked me if I knew how to pick a lock, and when I responded “yes” she replied, “see, this is why I hire the former delinquents instead of the suck-ups. You’re actually useful.”

I then let her into her office.

I once had a friend who was a physics professor at a prominent local university. One time, he got bored, made a super low-friction spinning stool, and created what was essentially a 30 pound gyroscope in a suitcase.

Then we all took turns playing with angular momentum until we puked.

willgrahamisdelicious
drtanner-sfw:

rikakuuma:

vulnerate:

the-exercist:

dreamofunconsciousness:

the-exercist:

my-way-to-get-skinny:

Still hungry?

Absolutely!
The average active adult needs 2,000 calories per day in order to function in a safe and healthy manner. If I’m active to the point where I consistently run 1+ hour every day, then it is far more likely that my caloric needs are around 2,400-2,500.
Considering that, a meal of 1,200 calories would perfectly suit my needs. It would supply roughly half of my calorie requirements, which is a God-send since a fast food meal is relatively cheap. It’s a great value, especially if I don’t have much time to cook or have the resources to prepare my own meals!
The average burger is going to supply me with significant protein and carbs. That’s exactly what I’d need in order to build more muscle and have enough energy to make it through a workout. Even the sugar within the meal can be beneficial in supplying me with a boost of energy and can stop me from feeling hungry for a prolonged period of time. Not half bad.
Is this the most healthy meal known to man? Of course not. But it’s still a very reasonable deal and the calorie count is well within the average adult’s daily needs. 
Don’t let calories scare you! You need them. If you were capable of burning off an entire meal within the hour, you’d probably be dead by now.

1200 empty calories in a meal
next to no nutrition. all the calories are sugar and fat. that’s it. you’ll have no energy and have glucose spikes in your blood because the lack of fiber because of the lack of complex carbs. this is diabetes in a meal. 
so no, you should not be hungry for diabetes

Nutritionally, this BK meal contains roughly 28g of protein and 3g of dietary fiber. It potentially also includes 35% of our Vitamin C daily requirements, 2% Vitamin A, 12% calcium, and 27% iron. Of the 1,010 calories (that I could verify directly from the company’s nutritional information guide), only 410 are from fat. That isn’t a terribly significant amount of fat, in the long run, nor are the nutrients small enough to be viewed as negligible.
Eating this will not cause you to get diabetes. Eating this meal is perfectly fine if you do have diabetes, as long as you are able to adjust your insulin intake accordingly. So don’t use an illness as your debate point - Diabetic people are not a prop.

"So don’t use an illness as your debate point - Diabetic people are not a prop." I want that and variations of that on t shirts.

damn, man. Someone just got completely schooled by a nutritionist.

THIS A GOOD POST

drtanner-sfw:

rikakuuma:

vulnerate:

the-exercist:

dreamofunconsciousness:

the-exercist:

my-way-to-get-skinny:

Still hungry?

Absolutely!

The average active adult needs 2,000 calories per day in order to function in a safe and healthy manner. If I’m active to the point where I consistently run 1+ hour every day, then it is far more likely that my caloric needs are around 2,400-2,500.

Considering that, a meal of 1,200 calories would perfectly suit my needs. It would supply roughly half of my calorie requirements, which is a God-send since a fast food meal is relatively cheap. It’s a great value, especially if I don’t have much time to cook or have the resources to prepare my own meals!

The average burger is going to supply me with significant protein and carbs. That’s exactly what I’d need in order to build more muscle and have enough energy to make it through a workout. Even the sugar within the meal can be beneficial in supplying me with a boost of energy and can stop me from feeling hungry for a prolonged period of time. Not half bad.

Is this the most healthy meal known to man? Of course not. But it’s still a very reasonable deal and the calorie count is well within the average adult’s daily needs. 

Don’t let calories scare you! You need them. If you were capable of burning off an entire meal within the hour, you’d probably be dead by now.

1200 empty calories in a meal

next to no nutrition. all the calories are sugar and fat. that’s it. you’ll have no energy and have glucose spikes in your blood because the lack of fiber because of the lack of complex carbs. this is diabetes in a meal. 

so no, you should not be hungry for diabetes

Nutritionally, this BK meal contains roughly 28g of protein and 3g of dietary fiber. It potentially also includes 35% of our Vitamin C daily requirements, 2% Vitamin A, 12% calcium, and 27% iron. Of the 1,010 calories (that I could verify directly from the company’s nutritional information guide), only 410 are from fat. That isn’t a terribly significant amount of fat, in the long run, nor are the nutrients small enough to be viewed as negligible.

Eating this will not cause you to get diabetes. Eating this meal is perfectly fine if you do have diabetes, as long as you are able to adjust your insulin intake accordingly. So don’t use an illness as your debate point - Diabetic people are not a prop.

"So don’t use an illness as your debate point - Diabetic people are not a prop." I want that and variations of that on t shirts.

damn, man. Someone just got completely schooled by a nutritionist.

THIS A GOOD POST

willgrahamisdelicious
In 2014, the cheerleaders revolted. This January, rookie NFL cheerleader Lacy T. kicked things off when she filed a class action lawsuit against the Oakland Raiders, alleging that the team fails to pay its Raiderettes minimum wage, withholds their pay until the end of the season, imposes illegal fines for minor infractions (like gaining 5 pounds), and forces cheerleaders to pay their own business expenses (everything from false eyelashes to monthly salon visits). Within a month, Cincinnati Bengals cheerleader Alexa Brenneman had filed a similar suit against her team, claiming that the Ben-Gals are paid just $2.85 an hour for their work on the sidelines. And Tuesday, five former Buffalo Bills cheerleaders filed suit against their own team, alleging that the Buffalo Jills were required to perform unpaid work for the team for about 20 hours a week. Unpaid activities included: submitting to a weekly “jiggle test” (where cheer coaches “scrutinized the women’s stomach, arms, legs, hips, and butt while she does jumping jacks”); parading around casinos in bikinis “for the gratification of the predominantly male crowd”; and offering themselves up as prizes at a golf tournament, where they were required to sit on men’s laps on the golf carts, submerge themselves in a dunk tank, and perform backflips for tips (which they did not receive). The Buffalo Jills cheerleaders take home just $105 to $1,800 for an entire season on the job.
willgrahamisdelicious

chupaflora:

pondprincen:

bottomjared:

Hey! So, Coming Out Day is coming up soon (Oct. 11) and I just want to post a very stern reminder to NOT out anyone without their explicit permission.

Do NOT out anyone.

Got it?

Okay.

this is also a less important point, but still worth noting: DO NOT “come out” as an ally. don’t you dare.

Also - don’t feel pressured to come out. You don’t have an obligation to put yourself in an unsafe situation for any reason.

halfgap
destiny-smasher:

So far, Steven’s powers have been:A bright pink shieldA bright pink bubbleMagical healing saliva
And he is always STOPPING fights, usually peacefully and in nonviolent ways, trying to get both sides to get along and understand each other. Suffice it to say, he is not your typical superhero. In fact, he’s really not that super yet. He’s still on training wheels. And yet he often manages to end conflicts WITHOUT powers or weapons that destroy others.
And I love what this show is doing with him and all of his friends. Especially in a pop culture that is overpopulated these days with “save the world” shenanigans and focusing on powers and shock value instead of being “strong in the real way.”
I’m already proud of this little guy and the small steps he’s made. His journey isn’t one of leaps and bounds but baby steps, like real people.
This week’s wonderful two-parter has set up what the show has been foreshadowing for some while: that Steven, being half Human and half Gem, will forge a path that unites both kinds of beings — a path paved by acts of non-violence, understanding, and compassion. Where his merit and strength as a hero isn’t defined by his powers (which, BTW, completely fly in the face of typical superhero and gender role BS), but instead by HIS CHOICES.
And THAT is the kind of hero story we need these days, IMO.
I’m sick of watching characters save the world from evil.
I want to see characters saving themselves, saving each other — personal journeys about making choices and resolving conflicts, not just slapping “evil” around. Even SU’s plot twists don;t feel cheap. They feel rewarding, because they are always foreshadowed and always recontextualize earlier events that maybe didn’t make sense. They feel planned, thought out, CARED for, just like the characters who populate the world.
Steven’s story, especially given the moral ambiguities brought to the table recently, really has a lot of potential to do these things — to be a personal journey more than typical “destroy evil” stuff — and in many ways, it has already.
I believe in Steven.

destiny-smasher:

So far, Steven’s powers have been:
A bright pink shield
A bright pink bubble
Magical healing saliva

And he is always STOPPING fights, usually peacefully and in nonviolent ways, trying to get both sides to get along and understand each other. Suffice it to say, he is not your typical superhero. In fact, he’s really not that super yet. He’s still on training wheels. And yet he often manages to end conflicts WITHOUT powers or weapons that destroy others.

And I love what this show is doing with him and all of his friends. Especially in a pop culture that is overpopulated these days with “save the world” shenanigans and focusing on powers and shock value instead of being “strong in the real way.”

I’m already proud of this little guy and the small steps he’s made. His journey isn’t one of leaps and bounds but baby steps, like real people.

This week’s wonderful two-parter has set up what the show has been foreshadowing for some while: that Steven, being half Human and half Gem, will forge a path that unites both kinds of beings — a path paved by acts of non-violence, understanding, and compassion. Where his merit and strength as a hero isn’t defined by his powers (which, BTW, completely fly in the face of typical superhero and gender role BS), but instead by HIS CHOICES.

And THAT is the kind of hero story we need these days, IMO.

I’m sick of watching characters save the world from evil.

I want to see characters saving themselves, saving each other — personal journeys about making choices and resolving conflicts, not just slapping “evil” around. Even SU’s plot twists don;t feel cheap. They feel rewarding, because they are always foreshadowed and always recontextualize earlier events that maybe didn’t make sense. They feel planned, thought out, CARED for, just like the characters who populate the world.

Steven’s story, especially given the moral ambiguities brought to the table recently, really has a lot of potential to do these things — to be a personal journey more than typical “destroy evil” stuff — and in many ways, it has already.

I believe in Steven.

counterpunches

You might be aromantic if…

anagnori:

Aromanticism can be really hard to figure out, especially since we’re often not sure what “romantic attraction” is supposed to be, so I made a list of things I’ve often seen in myself and other aromantic-spectrum people.

These are just generalizations. They won’t apply to every aromantic-spectrum person; and some non-aromantic people will have some of these things, too. Some of the list items are contradictory. Having any of the experiences listed below is not proof that you’re aromantic, nor are you any less aromantic if few of them apply to you. But if you’ve been trying to figure out your romantic orientation, and a lot of these sound really familiar to you…then it may mean something.

I also made a list of words relevant to aro-spectrum people in case that helps.

  1. When you discovered the word “aromantic,” it felt like something finally clicked into place for you.
  2. Identifying as aromantic makes you feel relieved, free, happy, or more like yourself.
  3. When you discovered the concept of a “squish” suddenly a lot of things made more sense to you.
  4. You have trouble telling the difference between romantic and friendly feelings.
  5. You’ve never had a crush on someone, or fallen in love.
  6. You’re not sure if you’ve ever had a crush on someone or fallen in love.
  7. You have trouble telling the difference between a crush and a squish, or between romantic and aesthetic/sexual/sensual attraction.
  8. You have doubted whether crushes or love really exist, or if they’re just cultural constructs.
  9. You find romance boring, annoying or upsetting when it appears in fiction, even if it’s written well.
  10. You once thought that having a crush on someone meant you admired them or really wanted to be their friend.
  11. You thought crushes were something you consciously decided to have, and selected an acquaintance or celebrity to be your crush, because everyone else was doing it.
  12. You forgot which acquaintance or celebrity you were supposed to have a crush on.
  13. If you’re not asexual, a “friends with benefits” relationship sounds ideal to you.
  14. You have trouble relating, or feeling involved, when your friends discuss their romantic relationships or romantic feelings.
  15. Falling in love doesn’t seem very exciting to you.
  16. You don’t understand why other people make such a big deal out of having crushes or falling in love.
  17. You don’t understand why people do ridiculous, irrational or over-the-top things in the name of love.
  18. You don’t understand why finding someone sexually/aesthetically attractive would lead you to want a committed relationship with them.
  19. Or, maybe you sort of understand those things in an abstract way, but you can’t really relate to them.
  20. You have never had a romantic relationship - not because you couldn’t get one, but because you just never really bothered to try, or you liked being single better.
  21. When a romantic relationship gets serious, it makes you feel cold, distant or uncomfortable.
  22. Getting a romantic partner feels more like fulfilling an obligation, or something you’re supposed to do, than something you’re really enthusiastic about.
  23. Your romantic partners always seem to be way more into the lovey-dovey stuff than you are.
  24. A likable person suggests having a romantic relationship with you, and you’re indifferent to it - you’re open to trying it, but you won’t get disappointed without it. Other people may find your indifference bizarre or think you’re giving off mixed messages.
  25. You have felt guilty about not loving your romantic partner as much as they loved you, even though you sincerely cared about them and wanted to love them back.
  26. You have felt suffocated, repressed or tense in a romantic relationship, even though you really liked your partner and they hadn’t done anything wrong.
  27. When your last romantic relationship ended, you felt relieved and free more than you felt sad, even if your partner broke it off, and even if you liked them very much as a person.
  28. You’re more excited by making a new best friend than by falling in love.
  29. You wouldn’t mind marrying your best friend and spending your life with them, even though you’re not in love with them.
  30. You’d rather spend Friday night having a sleepover party with your buddies than going out on a date.
  31. You want a best friend much more than you want a romantic relationship.
  32. It’s not so much the idea of being single forever that bothers you, so much as being alone or unwanted.
  33. You are either oblivious to other people flirting with you, or feel uncomfortable or threatened by it.
  34. You are sometimes perceived as flirtatious when you only meant to be friendly.
  35. You live in a large community and see or meet hundreds of people around your age every year, but none of them have ever stirred romantic feelings in you.
  36. You recognize whether something is romantic or not by comparing it to other gestures, words and signals that your culture has taught you are romantic, rather than “feeling” the romance of it intuitively.
  37. When you say or do romantic things, it feels like you’re following a script or copying romantic things you’ve seen elsewhere, rather than something spontaneous and natural to you.
  38. When thinking about what sort of person you’d want to date, your criteria are identical to what you would want from a best friend.
  39. The main benefit you get from a romantic relationship is either platonic, sensual, sexual, or a combination of those; the romantic aspect is okay but it’s not really the part you like most.
  40. You have trouble imagining romantic activities that you would enjoy, unless those activities are also fun or interesting for you on a platonic or intellectual level.
  41. You feel like your closest friends and/or queerplatonic partners are better at fulfilling your emotional needs than romantic partners would be.
  42. You would rather be huggy, cuddly or emotionally intimate with all of your friends instead of reserving your intimacy for just one person.
  43. You would rather have a queerplatonic relationship than a typical romantic relationship.
  44. You don’t feel as if you’re missing anything in your life right now; having a romantic partner might be nice, but you don’t need it or seek it out.
  45. The idea of being single forever sounds awesome to you.
  46. You enjoy gestures and activities that are traditionally labeled “romantic,” but at no point during them do you actually feel attracted to whoever you’re with.
  47. You don’t enoy gestures and activities that are traditionally labeled romantic, either because the romance aspect bothers you, or because all of them are just plain unappealing to you.
  48. You avoid going places where people are likely to flirt with you, such as bars, parties, nightclubs, and concerts.
  49. You’re not sure why other people enjoy romantic stories; you usually just find the lead characters to be annoying, boring or dysfunctional.
  50. You like the idea of having a big wedding celebration more than the idea of actually marrying someone.

Feel free to add your own.